TRUGLO TFO Tactical Universal Shotgun Front Sight

TRUGLO TFO Tactical Universal Shotgun Front Sight

Tritium sights are bright during the nigh but not during the day. Fiber optic (light gathering) sights are very bright during the day but canno be seen in the night.

TruGlo Company made sight which combines both fiber optic and Tritium elements. Very interesting sight for tactical or home defense shotguns.

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Remington 1100 Shotgun Review, Top 8 Upgrades and Accessories

Remington 1100

Remington has made gas-operated shotguns since the 1950s. Their very first one manufactured was the Model 58 semi-automatic shotgun. This shotgun line enjoyed a fair amount of success between 1956 and 1963. But then, they built a better gas-operated shotgun which reduced recoil a lot more. This model was called the Remington Model 1100. It was first introduced in 1963 and has been manufactured ever since. The three most common gauges manufactured for this shotgun are the 12-gauge, 28-gauge, .410 bore and 20-gauge.

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Remington Versa Max Competition Tactical Review

Remington Versa Max Competition Tactical Review

The Remington Versa Max Competition Tactical shotgun was first introduced in 2010. Remington had been determined to design a shotgun with a state-of-the-art autoloading action system. What they ended up producing was a tactical shotgun with the best performance and reliability that you’ve ever seen. The reason it is called a “competition tactical” shotgun is because it is suitable for both personal defense purposes and competition purposes. This gives you the convenience of being able to take the shotgun that you use for home defense and bring it to a sporting competition or shooting range for recreational purposes.

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Reloading Shotgun Ammo at Home (Best Press, Molds) UPDATED 2020

Shotshell Reloading

Shotgun Ammo Reloading at Home

Shotgun ammunition is unique because you can reload the shells at home if you have the right equipment available. This certainly beats paying $20 for 10 rounds of shotgun shells that you will go through within an hour. If you are a hunter who frequently goes shooting or if you simply like to target practice with your shotgun then you need to learn how to reload shells at home.

In the beginning, it will require an upfront investment for purchasing the reloading machine and the shells that you will be loading up. If you already have existing shells then that’s fine too. Just make sure you have high quality shells made by a reputable manufacturer such as Remington, Winchester, Rio, etc. Between their durable plastic cases and brass heads, they will give you plenty of reloads before they are worn out. Some gun clubs may even sell empty shells over the internet at very affordable prices too. So there are a lot of options out there for obtaining shells. As for the loader, these cost between $50 and $100. This is a very minimal investment when you consider how much money it will save you on purchasing more shotgun shells.

There are five components to a shotgun shell that you will need; the hull, gunpowder, pellets, wad and primer. Then you’ll want either a progressive loader or a single-stage loader to load the shells with the birdshot, buckshot or slugs. A progressive loader is a machine that can reload many shells at the same time. All you have to do is take a little bit of time setting up the machine with the necessary components. With the single stage machine, there is only one step to set it up and then each time you pull the handle it produces one shotgun shell. Make sure you read the manual on the loader to learn exactly how to use the machine because different models have different instructions. The type of loading machine you purchase should depend on what you will need it for. If you are just using a shotgun for self defense and don’t intend on shooting it very often then go with a single stage machine. But if you are a hunter who plans on shooting many rounds of ammunition on a regular basis then you’ll want a progressive loader that can reload shells much faster.

Shotgun ammunition reloading is when you fill the empty shotshells back up with the elements that make them work such as primer, gunpowder, pellets, wad and so on. Users often want to do this to save money from having to purchase the expensive factory preloaded shells. However, the hardest part for a newbie is learning how to perform the shell reloading process. It requires someone who can give great attention to every minute detail. This will ensure that the ammunition you prepare is safe and reliable for shooting from your shotgun.

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Practical Shotgun Shooting (IPSC) for Beginners, Part 3 (Types of Targets and Stages)

IPSC Paper Target

The third article of the “Practical Shotgun Shooting for Beginners” series. Thanks for your great feedback and comments about the previous articles.

You can read the previous articles here:
Practical Shotgun Shooting (IPSC) for Beginners, Part 2 (Upgrades, Ammo Belts, Equipment)
Practical Shotgun Shooting (IPSC) for Beginners, Part 1 (Divisions, Ready Conditions, Basic Upgrades)

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Le « shotgun IPSC » pour les nuls ! 3ème article : Les différentes cibles et les types de parcours.

IPSC Paper Target

Tout d’abord, « merci ! » pour les nombreux retours positifs sur les 2 précédents articles. Ci-joint je vous redonne les liens pour y accéder directement:
1er article : Divisions, conditions de départ, améliorations/modifications matériels.
2ème article : Améliorations/customisation, ceinture et équipements

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Review of the 4 Pistol Grips for the Remington 870 Shotgun, Part 2

Blackhawk Knoxx Breachersgrip Pistol Grip Remington 870

Read first part here: Review of the 4 Pistol Grips for the Remington 870 Shotgun

Thanks to Synchronizor for this detailed review!

Control Interaction:

There are three controls that an 870 user manipulates with their shooting hand: the trigger, the safety switch, and the slide release. With the traditional semi-grip shotgun stocks that the 870 was designed to use, these controls are all easy to reach and manipulate. Pistol grips, whether part of a stock or stand-alone, can have a significant effect on how – and how easily – these controls are manipulated. Pistol grips rarely interfere with the gun’ s trigger for obvious reasons, but they can – and frequently do – make working the safety or slide release slower or more difficult.

The 870’ s cross-bolt safety is located right behind the trigger, and with a traditional stock that’ s no wider than the receiver and doesn’ t enclose the rear of the trigger guard, it is possible to apply pressure on the safety with the side of the finger, rather than the tip. This allows the user to disengage the safety while keeping their fingertip on or very near the trigger, so a shot can be made virtually immediately. With traditional stocks, the safety is also fairly easily reached with the thumb or middle finger for re-engagement, or for disengagement in the case of left-handed shooters using an 870 with a right-handed safety switch.

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Review of the 4 Pistol Grips for the Remington 870 Shotgun

Remington 870 Pistol Grips Only

Thanks to Synchronizor for this detailed review!

I won’t get into when, where, and for what I think pistol grips should and shouldn’t be used, because it would just add several thousand more words to what is already a massive piece. I’ll simply say that while they have many downsides, and a fixed or folding stock will be a better choice for many situations, pistol-gripped shotguns do have their place. They’re very compact & maneuverable, and (usually) lighter than a full stock, which can be beneficial on a gun that’s used more as a tool than a weapon, or one that needs to be stored or deployed in very tight spaces. They’re also cool; a lot of folks (myself included) buy a pistol grips just for fun, and that’s a perfectly legitimate reason to own one.

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