I was curious about that but never had a chance to test that. But recently the ejector spring broke on my Remington 870 and that was a good opportunity to test the shotgun without the ejector spring.

Remington 870 Work Without the Ejector Spring
Remington 870 Work Without the Ejector Spring

It will work! The shotgun was working properly but with much bigger chance of the stove pipe problem. I had a stove pipe for about each 5-10 shots. So yes, you can still use your shotgun with broken ejector spring in an emergency situation but you need to replace the ejector spring as soon as possible.

Why shotgun? Versatile, powerful, easy to use.

When you make the decision to purchase a firearm, you have a lot of choices available. Mainly, you need to think about what you’re going to use the firearm for and what type of firearm would best suit your needs for this. Most people who purchase firearms will want to go hunting, target shooting, competitive shooting, or just keep it around for home defense. Well, there is one type of firearm, in particular, that can accommodate all three of these purposes. This would be the shotgun. The great thing about a shotgun is that it is easy for anyone to use, even people who have little to no experience with firearms. And because shotguns are so powerful, you don’t have to be a perfect shot to hit your target. But if you are able to aim accurately, you can be sure that your target will be destroyed with one shot.

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There is another difficult to identify problem of the Remington 870. Sometimes, it is very difficult to to pull the forend after the shot. You need to pull it several times to extract the fired shotshell from the chamber. Polishing a chamber helps but it still can happen.

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Failure to feed is a pretty rare problem which is also difficult to identify. I didn’t understand what happened first times when I experienced it. You feel that you hit something when you push forend forward trying to feed another round and when you check what happened you see a shotshell on a carrier and everything looks normal.

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The original Remington 870 shotgun was designed in a way that allowed the shotshell to get jammed between the carrier and the bolt. If you tried to remove the shell, it would be a rather difficult process. If you ask anyone who used Remington 870 shotguns before the 1980s, they’ll tell you that it required a user to disassemble the shotgun. Don’t do what a lot of gun owners do and just slam your shotgun onto a hard surface because that will damage the action bars.

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A rifled choke is different from all the common chokes. It has rifling inside which is designed to add extra spin to a slug in order to make it more accurate. As you know, rifled barrels always make shooting more accurate. There are lots of holy wars about rifled chokes. Some people think that a short-rifled choke which is just 3.5 inches long cannot add sufficient spin that can make shots more precise. Others argue that tests show improvement in the accuracy of the shots. I have tested the rifled Benelli Choke some time ago and the results were pretty interesting. They were almost the same as with the rifled Remington choke.

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There are a lot of controversies over the gun laws, particularly those pertaining to self-defense with a firearm. Many gun owners are confused about the laws of self-defense because different jurisdictions throughout the country have different laws. The most confusion surrounds the laws of “duty to retreat” and “stand your ground.” Certain jurisdictions have a duty to retreat requirement which means that somebody who is threatened by someone else cannot shoot the person making the threat. Instead, they have to retreat to a safe place and simply put themselves out of harm’s way. Then there are other jurisdictions which let people being threatened exercise their “stand-your-ground” rights. Stand-your-ground is a law that lets people being threatened to use deadly force as a method of self-defense if there is truly a reason for them to believe their life is in danger.

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Update on Remington 870 vs Mossberg 590 comparison on Remington 870 Forum:

I did a review about comparing the Remington 870 Tactical Express (6+1) and the Mossberg 590SP (7+1). I recently have put about 200 – 300 rounds into both after about a month total in shooting. I dry practiced with both on a regular basis for about 10 – 15 minutes every 2 to 4 days. I used dummy rounds (snap caps) for the dry practice. Here are my opinions about the differences in both. Before I compare the differences I just want to let everyone know here that I am very happy I have both and would not want it any other way. My father taught me to know and adapt to every weapon you have or at least get familiar with it so you can handle any challenges in the future. So that is what I do with all the firearms I own. So here were the differences after about 1 month of shooting and dry practicing both.

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