Best Night Sights for Glock 17, 19, 22, 26, 32, 37, 20,21,29,30,30S,37,41

Meprolight Tru-Dot Tritium Night Sight Sets

Best Night Sights for Glock

There are all kinds of sights available for handguns like the Glock 17, 19, 22, 26, 32, 37. However, out of all them, the tritium night sights are the most preferred amongst Glock owners. Why are they preferred? For one thing, the tritium can be seen in dimly lit environments and totally dark environments. You also don’t need a battery to power the lighting source because the tritium lighting doesn’t come from electricity, lasers, or bulbs. It is a radioactive isotope that comes from hydrogen which emits a soft bright glowing light. Since the tritium has radioactive decay that emits electrons, this causes the phosphor of the tritium to glow. It does not need any kind of outside power source whatsoever. The radioactive decay can last for several years which means it will glow for up to 10-12 years.

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Best Kel-Tec KSG Shotgun Accessories and Upgrades

Kel-Tec KSG Shotgun

The Kel-Tec KSG shotgun is a revolutionary 12-gauge bullpup pump-action shotgun. In case you didn’t know, a bullpup shotgun is one where the action is situated behind the trigger group. The Kel-Tec KSG contains two magazine tubes that allow a person to manually switch between them in real-time. Each magazine tube can hold seven shotgun shells that are 12-gauge and 2.75 inches long. If you are using 3-inch shotgun shells, then each magazine tube can hold six of them. This can certainly hold a lot more ammunition than a classic shotgun which only has one magazine tube. The people who use the Kel-Tec KSG are generally those who like to shoot a lot of ammunition and don’t like to waste too much time with reloading.

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Best Shotgun Kit and Oil for Cleaning and Lubrication

Beretta Shotgun Cleaning Kit

Shotguns need to be cleaned like any other tool or item that you use frequently. Some gun owners just don’t realize that every time they fire their shotgun, it leaves a little bit of residue inside the barrel, action, and chamber of the gun. This residue is actually made up of tiny particles called “fouling” which come from the shells that you’ve fired. The fouling particles are generated from the used birdshot, buckshot, slugs, wad, and gunpowder. Each time you fire a shell, a little bit of this residue is left behind inside the shotgun. If you don’t clean up the residue on a regular basis, it will build up over time and eventually impair the functionality of the weapon. In addition, excessive sweat and moisture build up in the shotgun could cause the weapon’s metal parts to become corroded. Once this happens, these parts of the gun will become rusty and cause your gun to malfunction.

There are four types of fouling you’ll commonly find inside a used shotgun; carbon, copper, lead, and plastic. Carbon comes from the burnt gunpowder which is used to propel the ammunition out of the chamber and through the barrel. You don’t usually see the carbon particles, but they spread inside the chamber and even get on the shooter’s hands. Copper particles may be there after you shoot if the slugs are jacketed with copper (sabot slugs). As for the projectiles inside of the shotshells, they are all typically made out of lead material. This means when you fire the shotshells in your shotgun, lead residue from the projectiles will get left in your barrel after you fire them. And finally, the plastic from the wads of the shells will create plastic residue that gets left behind as well.

When searching for the best shotgun cleaning kit, there are three cleaning kits in particular that you should pay attention to because they are affordable and highly regarding amongst gun enthusiasts. They are the Beretta Shotgun Cleaning Kit, the Tetra ValuPro III Shotgun Cleaning, and Hoppe’s No. 9 Cleaning Kit. All three of these cleaning kits can be purchased online and shipped right to your doorstep. Some of these cleaning kits cater to specific shotgun brands and calibers while others are more versatile and can be used to clean multiple types of shotguns. But no matter which one you choose, it will certainly be worth the investment in order to sustain the life expectancy and functionality of your shotguns.

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Best Shotgun Flashlights – Updated, August 2020

Testing FAB Defense Speedlight Flashlight on CDM Gear MOD-C Clamp on Remington 870

It is extremely important to have flashlight on your shotgun. You can’t shoot if you can’s see a target. I have tested many flashlights and decided to make a new post. This post has information about old flashlights and new ones.

I was surprised that some of the inexpensive flashlights are really good, reliable and bright. I still prefer Fad Defense Speedlight because of its compact size and brightness but you may choose one of the other flashlights.

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6 Best Red Dot (Reflex, Holographic) Sights for Shotgun

Remington 870 with Aimpoint Red Dot on Mesa Tactical Sidesaddle with Rail

Shotgun is mostly used on short distances, that is why you can see red dot or holographic non-magnifying sight on a shotgun more often than optic sight. Typically, red dot, reflex and holographic sights are designed for fast target acquisition usually within a 100-yard range, which is suitable for both hunting and tactical situations. Many shooting experts recommend that you shoot with both eyes open especially in a tactical situation. Red dot sights allow shooters to keep both eyes open because of the dedicated focusing of the sight. The shooting eye is not strained when using the sight.

A holographic sight on a weapon is a sight that does not magnify the image of the target. Instead, the sight has a glass optical window that the shooter looks through and sees a reticle image that gets superimposed on the target in the distance. Obviously, the reticle isn’t physically on the target, but in the glass optical window, it creates a hologram to make it appear like it is. This allows the shooter to more accurately aim at their intended target and fire at it without trying to get their target in the middle of some magnified crosshair.

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Best Remington 700 Stocks

Bell and Carlson Varmint/Tactical Rifle Stock for Remington 700

Once World War II had finally ended, an engineer of Remington Arms named Merle Walker started to create a cheaper alternative to the popular Remington 30. His creation would become the Remington 721. This particular rifle model featured a cylindrical receiver that was constructed with a piece of cylindrical bar stock. A lathe could be used to turn the stock too, instead of using various milling operations to machine it. This method would ultimately lower the production costs of the weapon.

Also, the 721 contained a lot of smaller metal components that were stamped, like the bottom metal. However, the finishing of the stocks was not as impressive as it was with the older Remington models. Walker continued to develop upon the 721 bolt-action rifle a lot further, resulting in the Remington 722 and 725 models. In 1962, the Remington 700 would be born.

Walker wanted the rifles to be more accurate and the lock time to be faster. When the Remington 700 was finished, it was mass produced just like the Remington 721 was before. There were originally two versions of the Remington 700 produced by the company. There was the Remington BDL and Remington ADL, which had long-action rifles and short-action rifles available. This let users chamber cartridges that were different from each other.

By the year 1969, Remington Arms released numerous upgrades for the Model 700, such as a rear bolt shroud that was longer, better finishing for the stock, and a jeweled bolt. In 1973, Remington even produced versions of the Model 700 for left-handed shooters. This was their way of competing with another rifle for left-handed shooters, the Savage 110 model. Left-handed rifles had only been produced by Savage at the time, so it was big news when Remington started doing it too. More Model 700 versions were released shortly after, like the 700ti which had a titanium receiver, the CDL, and the 700SPS. The Model 700 had been mostly designed as a hunting rifle, but it still had the capability of being useful as a sniper rifle for police and military operations. In 1966, the U.S. Marine Corps ordered the M40 rifles for its troops. Twenty years later, the U.S. Army would begin using the M24 sniper rifle.

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Best Remington 700 Upgrades: Stock, Bipod, Scope Base, Bolt Lift, Barrel

Harris Bipod for Remington 700 Rifle

The Model 700 has a bolt action which is manually operated and contains 2 forward lugs (dual-opposed). It has a lower bolt face which completely encloses the cartridge base. The extractor sits inside the bolt face as a C-clip. The ejector of the bolt face acts as a plunger which needs a coil spring to activate it. The bolt is constructed with 3 brazed pieces; the bolt handle, head, and body. Circular cross-section steel is used to mill the receiver.

There are many variations of the Remington 700. The bolt body has 2 lugs that are symmetrical and a diameter that is 17.65 millimeters. The lock time of the long action is approximately 3.2 milliseconds.

Different magazine configurations can be added to the Remington 700. You can add a blind magazine (which is a magazine without a floorplate), a detachable box magazine, or a standard magazine that does have a floorplate. Some versions are made for consumer use while others are made for police and military use. In some versions, there will be accessories like bipods and slings included with them.

Standard Model 700 Variants

One Remington variant of the Model 700 is their Mountain LSS model. This contains a barrel made from stainless steel and a stock that is laminated. Another variant is the Remington 700 SPS Varmint which contains a heavy barrel and laminated stock. This model is made specifically for hunting varmint. For a while, the most affordable 700 model was the 700 ADL, but this would eventually get replaced by the Model 700 Special Purpose Synthetic (SPS).

Since 1996, the Remington 700 ML rifle has been produced. This is a rifle which gets loaded at the muzzle. In 2000, the Remington 700 EtronX had the electronic primer ignition system built into it. However, this model and the EtronX primers only lasted on the commercial market for 3 years before their production was stopped. The model was simply not a success.

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Best Mossberg 500/590 Accessories and Upgrades

Magazine Extension for Mossberg 500/590

I had several posts about Mossberg 500/590 and was surprised by number of questions about this shotgun. First of all, I recommend checking infographic: Differences Between Remington 870 vs Mossberg 500 shotguns. It explains differences in controls and design. Mossberg 500/590 is a great and very popular shotgun. There are 10,000,000 of Mossberg 500/590 shotguns made to date.

So, this post is about the best and must have upgrades for Mossberg 500/590 shotguns.

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5 Best Optic Sights/Scopes for Shotguns: TruGlo, Bushnell, Simmons, Leupold – UPDATED 2021

Simmons Prohunter Shotgun Scope

One of the most popular shotgun accessories you can add to your existing shotgun is a scope. This gives you the ability to see far away targets and increases your accuracy tremendously. However, not all scopes are the same which is why you need to purchase a high-quality scope that gives you the most features possible.

Optic sights are a form of firearm sight technology which gives the shooter an image in their sight scope that is aligned with their aiming point. This image is basically a crosshair that allows you to easily aim at your intended target. The idea is to align the crosshair so that the middle of it is covering the target you want to shoot.

Now there are numerous kinds of sights available including telescopic sights, reflector sights, and holographic sights. The most commonly used one is the telescopic sight (scope), which is an optical telescope that magnifies the sight in front of you and paints a crosshair over it. You’ll find telescopic sights on many devices besides firearms such as surveying equipment. Scientists even use them on their bigger telescopes which are known as “finderscopes.”

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