Always wanted to have an AR-15 and now I have one. DPMS is a well know manufacturer of AR-15 rifles and I have chosen the one that will be awesome for dynamic shooting like 3-Gun or IPSC.

So, what makes it a good choice for a competitive shooter?

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Gun sock is a popular and inexpensive way to protect your shotgun during transportation and storage. I’ve bough two socks on Brownells. They are made by SACK UPS company which makes gun socks since 1985.

So, why do you need both long and short socks. I use long sock to transport my gun. Gun sock protects finish of my shotgun and also protects internal parts from dust, sand and dirt. Another good feature is that cotton cloth is treated with silicone and oil that helps inhibit rust. Gun sock will wick moisture away if your shotgun is wet. That is also important in cold weather when you can see condensate on your firearm when you bring it indoors.

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Shotgun and Rifle Trainings

Some photos from shotgun and rifle trainings today:

Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings
Shotgun and Rifle Trainings

Photos from one of the last rifle trainings, AR-15 rifles of different modifications. Most of them are used for practical shooting.

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Different Types of Shotgun Sights

Remington 870 Universal Ghost Ring Firesights
Remington 870 Universal Ghost Ring Firesights

Some of you may have seen your grandfather or older shooters lick their finger and touch the bead sight on their shotgun. Why was this done? There are many explanations and Hollywood has created some of the reasons but the one that makes the most sense is that the moisture puts a little shine on the sight. Some might say they do not need a shine and may need the sight blackened with a smudge pot as some used to do. It simply proves that everyone has his or her own techniques and style. The soot from the smudge was flat black and did not give off any reflection. In other words absolutely no glare. If the color of the front bead is the same as your target you may have a hard time distinguishing the two so on occasion you may need a contrast for better accuracy.

Shotguns can have bead sights, double bead sights, sights with a ventilated rib line, ghost ring sights, red dot scopes, blade sights, rear notched sights with a front post and magnifying scopes.

Typically, scopes are used when firing rifled slugs because of the extended range. Scopes are for stationary targets because it is very difficult to track a moving target through a scope. The shooter is forced to look up from the scope to use their peripheral vision to help find the target. Bead sights are usually for moving targets because the target can be followed rather easily with the bead. Bladed sights are used for stationary targets such as deer and turkey.
Double beaded sights usually have a ventilated rib running along the length of the barrel. The larger bead is at the end of the muzzle and the smaller bead sight halfway back. Some experts claim that having the two beads and a ventilated rib helps to maintain sight alignment because some shooters tend to look over the top of their sights immediately after depressing the trigger. Forcing the shooter to line up both beads along the rib will keep their cheek welded to the stock. Double beaded sights are used for flying birds and other moving targets.

Red dot scopes may or may not have magnification and the dot is not projected onto the target. The dot is used to line up the target through the scope. There is simply a red dot illuminated inside the scope tube. A red dot sight is for stationary targets.

Rear notched sights or sometimes called “v” sights are lined up with the front post. This ensures the weapon is lined up and once the front post is on target, the trigger is pulled. This type sight helps the shooter maintain their natural point of aim better.

Ghost ring sights can be mounted on tactical shotguns for close combat shooting. The shooter’s sight picture through the ghost ring is more pronounced at short distances. If using shot in your weapon you can adjust the spread to correspond to the sight picture at various ranges. The ghost ring sight is not ideal for moving targets.

Obviously, there is more to shooting than lining up on a target. Different shooting environments require different type sights. You would not use a scope for skeet shooting, or duck hunting because you simply cannot track through a scope. Open sights or beaded sights are ideal for skeet or bird hunting. As with anything, it will take practice and experimentation to find out what works best for you.

This is updated post about zeroing of the firearms.

You finally have the rifle out of the box and are anxious to shoot it. You cannot wait until you get to the range. Once there you set up the target, the silhouette at 25 meters looks close enough where you could throw a stone and hit it. You fire a round, scope it, and see that it missed the black. You try again and same placement. You move the weapon and find your shots are even farther from the black almost off the target completely. You blame the weapon and yourself. However, you may not realize that you have to adjust the weapon to you. The weapon may or may not have come from the factory with a mechanical zero or what some may call a battle sight zero. You have some adjustments to make.

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