Trouble Re-assembling Wingmaster

Remington 870 Repair and Gunsmithing.
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The Rattler
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Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 7:02 pm

Trouble Re-assembling Wingmaster

Post by The Rattler » Sat Dec 09, 2017 12:07 am

I don't know if this problem has the dignity of qualifying for the Repair 7 Gunsmithing subform, but here goes.

I have a 1960 Wingmaster on which I refinished the metal with Durablue. Not all of the trigger assembly parts is the Durablue have cured sufficiently to install the trigger assembly. I am trying to go ahead and install the slide block assembly, and breech bolt assembly, and action bars into the receiver. First question: Is it ill-advised to do this without first installing the trigger assembly?

I have owned both an 870 Magnum and the Wingmaster for only 2 years and do not shoot them often because I normally shoot clays with other guns. I clean them thoroughly each time I shoot them. I have trouble each time on re-assembly when I start inserting the bolt and action bars. I feel I need a third hand. I watched several videos on how to do this numerous times (including Synchronizer's), and have ultimately been successful re-installing these things each time before this. Every time, however, I marveled at why it successfully worked. What precisely did I do differently that time than the other times when it did not work? In any event, persistence eventually paid off.

This time, however, I have yet to be successful with the Wingmaster. While difficult, I can insert the bars into the channel for them in the receiver and even get the bolt to partially enter into the receiver. At that time, there is hard metal upon metal resistance. I then push the right shell latch, but the action bars and bolt never proceed any farther. Desperately, I push the left shell latch, but get the same result. On close examination, it appears that the taller metal at the front of the action bars for the slot in which the bolt sits, hits the side of the opening of the receiver. They just barely hit it, but it appears to stop forward progress. Could it be that the action bars became slightly bent while they were outside of the receiver during the Durablue process? If so, what do I do?

Is that taller piece on the action bars suppose to go under the metal at the receiver opening that is above the channel, to the inside of the inside of it, or what? Could it be that I am just not holding my mouth right?

Any insight will be greatly appreciated.

The Rattler
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Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 7:02 pm

Re: Trouble Re-assembling Wingmaster

Post by The Rattler » Sat Dec 09, 2017 10:05 pm

I finally held my mouth right and everything got installed. Persistence paid off. Sorry for any inconvenience.

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Banshee
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Re: Trouble Re-assembling Wingmaster

Post by Banshee » Sat Dec 09, 2017 11:54 pm

Nothing like figuring it out yourself.
The devil danced as he went down, in the hail of arrows comin' Out on the wild Montana ground, Custer died a-runnin'.

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John A.
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Re: Trouble Re-assembling Wingmaster

Post by John A. » Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:57 am

Duracoat cures slower than molasses.
When people ignorant of guns make gun laws, you have ignorant gun laws.
-John A.

The Rattler
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Re: Trouble Re-assembling Wingmaster

Post by The Rattler » Sun Dec 10, 2017 5:39 am

Durablue is much the same as Duracoat, but Durablue is designed to appear as original bluing. There is Matt Black and polished Black. I have Durablued 2 old shotguns so far.

The biggest disadvantage of Durablue is that it takes a very long time to cure. On the other hand, you do not need expensive equipment to apply it. It produces a final product, however, that looks almost exactly like bluing, that does require expensive equipment to apply. The manufacturer claims it lasts several lifetimes. I don’t know how they would know that, but that is their claim. No coating lasts without flaws through extremely tough use, but there are a lot of testimonials on YouTube that Duracoat holds up well under hard use. A requirement, however, is that it must be thoroughly degreased and well sanded, or even better sand blasted which adds to durability a lot. It is persnickety about good thorough metal preparation prior to application. So far, I like Durablue a lot.

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