Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Tactical, combat, military, law enforcement and home defense use of a Remington 870 shotgun.
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shootall
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Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Post by shootall » Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:19 pm

I see pictures here and other places including ranges , hunting and self defense classes where the brass on the shells is sticking out the top of these holders. Now on an 870 the support hand/arm should be under the gun not out to the side in a self defense situation. This is to insure no side pressure is put on the slide causing it to bind. With the arm/hand in this position the easy reload is to pull the shell DOWN out of the holder and insert it in the magazine ( hopefully you didn't run dry ) or slide your hand and shell up the side of the gun pushing the shell in the open ejection port. I have had shells in these holders for years with brass down . Used it this way in classes and hunting and have never had a shell fall out.
What do others think ?
To be honest the older I get the less stuff I like on my gun. A light maybe . A sling sometimes but not for most home defense , would not want it to catch on something like a door knob or such. I know it would be nice if both hands are needed.

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Synchronizor
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Re: Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Post by Synchronizor » Fri Jul 25, 2014 9:16 pm

Brass-up & brass-down (or rather, steel these days) can both be viable ways to keep shells, depending on the circumstances. For a left-side receiver-mount shell carrier, brass-down expedites magazine loading, while brass-up can allow for faster port loading. It's common practice to keep "bread & butter" shells like buckshot brass-down for topping off the magazine, and special-situation shells like slugs brass-up for faster change-overs. This obviously depends a lot on the technique of the individual shooter. For example, some folks may be accustomed to port-loading from beneath the receiver, especially if they have an optic on the top of the gun. Keeping shells oriented differently is also a good way to ensure idiot-proof distinction between different loads in the same shell carrier. Finally, for applications like hunting or woods defense, where fast port or magazine loading is not required, keeping shells brass-up can ensure that they won't work loose and fall out due to recoil or rough handling.

I very much agree with the K.I.S.S. approach to a HD build. Though I have a ton of bells and whistles I can add to my 870 for different applications, I like to keep it simple and easy to handle for HD duty. Anything I don't need or won't use only makes a weapon less effective.
18_5me_plus1.JPG
My preferred HD build. Bead-sight fixed-choke barrel, +1 mag extension, walnut furniture, a tube of quality #4 buck, and nothing else.
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mercman
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Re: Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Post by mercman » Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:27 am

On all my 870's I run with buckshot brass down and slugs brass up. I can port load with equal ease over the top or under the action as the scenario dictates. As with any other action repetition and practice are your friend!

Back in the academy we used to do the 'Rolling Thunder' drill by port loading exclusively. A great way to practice and become proficient with port loading.
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shootall
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Re: Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Post by shootall » Mon Jul 28, 2014 6:34 pm

i port load from under the gun reaching under with my left hand using fingers to roll the shell into the port. How do ya do it other wise ? asking for info not argument.
thanks. As for keeping slugs and buck separated . I use green slugs , red # 00 buck and clear #4 buck. When aval. But I see the value up up and down for the same reason.

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Synchronizor
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Re: Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Post by Synchronizor » Tue Jul 29, 2014 9:53 pm

When I port-load, I tend to do it over the receiver. I open the action, pull the shell, turn the gun on its side, drop in the shell, and close the action. This can be done with either hand, and with the gun turned over just a tad more than 90 degrees, the shell will still chamber reliably if the action hasn't been opened far enough for the carrier to engage.

mercman
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Re: Side saddle and stock sleeve shell holders

Post by mercman » Thu Aug 14, 2014 4:24 pm

Yeah, gravity is your friend! I usually roll a shell over the top of the rx and drop it in the open chamber and run the forearm forward. Either way, over or under, is fast but depending on how you stack your rounds in the shell carrier dictates which method may be slightly more reliable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7AjaNwtKww

I don't roll my shotgun over but keep eyes on target and run the shell over the top.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qg1ANowlCIg
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